Buy a cheap Ferrari for only US$20,000 - Click » HERE «
Dodge M-80 Concept Pickup

Dodge M-80 Concept Pickup

The Dodge M80 concept truck debuted at the 2002 North American International Auto Show. Designer John Opfer said that his role models were the Jeep Wagoneer and the (Mitsubishi-based) Dodge Raider compact pickup. “It not only has a clean, modern design, but it is truly functional.

To order your new Dodge M-80 Concept Pickup rival with a brand new Toyota Camry V6 engine for only US$20,000.

You can easily get to your gear in the back, and if the bed is not long enough, you can open the flipper-glass and add the cabin to your load-length.” [In this regard it was similar to the Chevrolet Avalanche’s midgate setup.]

Dodge M-80 Concept Pickup

The Dodge M80 was a small, affordable truck with a satin-stainless-steel-look Dodge crosshair grille and headlamp surrounds, classic round lamps, and metallic slate-gray, molded-in-color plastic fenders. In profile, M80 was festooned with fender vent vanes, push-button door handles, integrated plastic side-storage lockers, dual spin-off fuel-filler caps, and stamped-steel 20” wheels with 265/50R20 tires.

Dodge M-80 Concept Pickup

The five-foot bed was protected by a durable PET-plastic liner and bulkhead, using myriad tie-down cleats compatible with Mopar bike-, ski- and surfboard racks. The tailgate had “stamped-through” lettering for the Dodge and 4x4 emblems. The back of the cab had a full-width flipper-glass.

Dodge M-80 Concept Pickup

The Dodge M-80’s interior was designed by Jeff Gale, who said, “This concept asked for a no-frills, rugged and durable interior, and it should offer unexpected and youthful features.” That was, Mr. Gale said, why there was an abundance of body-color sheet-metal panels on the inside of M80, with satin-silver hard-plastic covers, aluminum foot pedals, and water-repelling Neoprene-look seat-trim.

Dodge M-80 Concept Pickup

The center console doubled as a portable cooler, while the lightweight seats could be removed and used outdoors. Behind the fold-flat seats was a truck-wide bin for wet goods such as shoes, umbrellas, or a snowboard. The instrument panel included a large storage drawer.